Saturday, October 5, 2013

Saturday Links: Rembrandt, Fin-de-Siècle Paris and Shunga at the British Museum



Teylers has one of the world's leading collections of Rembrandt etchings and drawings. For this occasion, Rembrandt's 100 most beautiful works will be brought out of storage. For a brief time, his famous self-portraits, moving Bible scenes, tender portraits of his wife Saskia, racy scenes and dramatic landscapes will again be on display for all to admire.
http://www.teylersmuseum.eu/index.php?item=71&flact=1&lang=en


The Peggy Guggenheim Collection presents The Avant-gardes of Fin-de-Siècle Paris: Signac, Bonnard, Redon, and their Contemporaries. About 100 paintings, drawings and a significant number of prints, drawn from notable private collections, focus on the French avant-gardes of the late nineteenth century, with special attention paid to the Neo-Impressionist, Nabi, and Symbolist movements. Approximately 10 images on line plus small, concise information on the art movements of the time.
Through Jan 2014. http://www.guggenheim-venice.it/inglese/default.html


'Shunga' opens at the British Museum. In early modern Japan, 1600-1900, thousands of sexually explicit works of art were produced, known as ‘spring pictures’ (shunga). This exhibition, the first of its kind in the UK, examines the often tender, funny, beautiful and undoubtedly accomplished shunga that were produced by some of the masters of Japanese art, including Utamaro and Hokusai.

Shunga is in some ways a unique phenomenon in pre-modern world culture, in terms of the quantity, the quality and the nature of the art that was produced. The exhibition explores key questions about what is shunga, how it circulated and to whom, and why was it produced. In particular it begins to establish the social and cultural contexts for sex art in Japan and aims to reaffirm the importance of shunga in Japanese art history.

Shunga were mostly produced within the popular school known as ‘pictures of the floating world’ (ukiyo-e), by celebrated artists such as Hishikawa Moronobu (died 1694), Kitagawa Utamaro (died 1806) and Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). Earlier, medieval narrative art in Japan had already mixed themes of sex and humour. Luxurious shunga paintings were also produced for ruling class patrons by traditional artists such as members of the Kano school, sometimes influenced by Chinese examples. This was very different from the situation in contemporary Europe, where religious bans and prevailing morality enforced an absolute division between ‘art’ and ‘pornography’. http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions.aspx

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