Wednesday, January 22, 2014

250 Getty books go on line and the Roman de la Rose is now fully digitized plus more


Getty Publications today launched a Virtual Library, providing free online access to more than 250 of its backlist titles. The books are available to read online or download as PDFs. Getty President and CEO James Cuno launched the Virtual Library in a blog post on the Getty Iris today.

Link to Getty Publications: http://www.getty.edu/publications/

Text of article at the Examiner: http://www.examiner.com/list/getty-publications-provides-free-on-line-access-to-backlist-titles 


The text of the Roman de la Rose is now on line. My only quibble is that you can't see the thumbnails and chose to look at the pages with full sized illustrations. But it's still a medieval treasure that few of us would have been able to see in the past,

The text of the Roman de la Rose was begun around 1220, possibly by Guillaume de Lorris, and continued by Jean de Meun between 1269 and 1278.

Decoration includes 4 large miniatures in colours and gold with a large initial with acanthus leaves and a full panel border with naturalistic flowers, acanthus leaves, birds and insects. 88 column miniatures in colours and gold. Initials in colours and gold.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Harley_MS_4425

The Wellcome Trust, a leading British health organization, has created an online database of over 100 000 historical images, including many from the Middle Ages. The images can be found on the Wellcome Images website and come from manuscripts, paintings, etchings, and early photographs. http://wellcomeimages.org/

1 comment:

A Cuban In London said...

Good idea from Getty. I like that Cezanne. Nice cover.

Greetings from London.