Monday, July 31, 2017

Dubuffet and the Art Brut


July 31, 1901. Jean Philippe Arthur Dubuffet (31 July 1901 - 12 May 1985) was a French painter and sculptor. His idealistic approach to aesthetics embraced so called "low art" and eschewed traditional standards of beauty in favor of what he believed to be a more authentic and humanistic approach to image-making. In this image: A young lady looks at "Paysage charbonneux" by French artist Jean Dubuffet dated 1946, and valued at 3.5 million Marks (1.5 million Dollars) at the 34th International fair for modern art "Art Cologne" in Cologne, Germany, Friday, November 3, 2000.

 Grand Maitre Of The Outsider

Monsieur Plume with Creases in his Trousers

The Cow with the Subtle Nose
Influenced by Hans Prinzhorn's book Artistry of the Mentally Ill, Dubuffet coined the term art brut (meaning "raw art," often referred to as 'outsider art') for art produced by non-professionals working outside aesthetic norms, such as art by psychiatric patients, prisoners, and children.

Dubuffet felt that the simple life of the everyday human being contained more art and poetry than did academic art, or great painting. He found the latter to be isolating, mundane, and pretentious, and wrote in his Prospectus aux amateurs de tout genre that his aim was 'not the mere gratification of a handful of specialists, but rather the man in the street when he comes home from work....it is the man in the street whom I feel closest to, with whom I want to make friends and enter into confidence, and he is the one I want to please and enchant by means of my work.' To that end,

Dubuffet began to search for an art form in which everyone could participate and by which everyone could be entertained. He sought to create an art as free from intellectual concerns as Art Brut, and as a result, his work often appears primitive and childlike. His form is often compared to wall scratchings and children's art. Nonetheless, Dubuffet appeared to be quite erudite when it came to writing about his own work.

According to prominent art critic Hilton Kramer, "There is only one thing wrong with the essays Dubuffet has written on his own work: their dazzling intellectual finesse makes nonsense of his claim to a free and untutored primitivism. They show us a mandarin literary personality, full of chic phrases and up-to-date ideas, that is quite the opposite of the naive visionary."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Dubuffet
Dubuffet and the art brut

1 comment:

Carla Ives said...

Dubuffet is a totally unknown artist to me. I wouldn't pursue this type of art as I don't care much for it. Reading about why he drew and painted like this, though, is interesting. He thought it was "more authentic and humanistic." I'm not so sure, but there is something about it that grabs the imagination, like it or not.