Friday, January 12, 2018

Jusepe de Ribera. Born on this day in 1591

The Clubfooy
January 12, 1591. Jusepe de Ribera (January 12, 1591 - September 2, 1652) was a Spanish Tenebrist painter and printmaker, also known as José de Ribera and Josep de Ribera. He also was called Lo Spagnoletto ("the Little Spaniard") by his contemporaries and early writers. Ribera was a leading painter of the Spanish school, although his mature work was all done in Italy. In this image: Jusepe de Ribera, Saint James the Lesser, ca. 1632.  Born in Spain but worked in Italy, Ribera stated that Spain was "a loving mother to foreigners and a very cruel stepmother to her own sons. "

Faces contorted in pain, mutilated bodies, sagging flesh, bearded women and deformed boys: such is the stuff of Jusepe de Ribera's paintings. The fact that Ribera was probably the most influential painter of the Spanish Baroque (even more influential than his far more famous compatriot, Velázquez) tends to be overshadowed by the fact that his often twisted, bizarre images have categorized the artist as a painter of the dark and bloody, and nothing more.

But he was more than a painter of the grotesque and bizarre. In fact, a closer look at his oeuvre reveals that the artist was as much a master of Baroque color, dynamism and grandeur as he was a master of Caraveggesque chiaroscuro and naturalism. Furthermore, Ribera's prints and paintings alike had an enormous impact on the development of Baroque art all over Europe.

But he was more than a painter of the grotesque and bizarre. In fact, a closer look at his oeuvre reveals that the artist was as much a master of Baroque color, dynamism and grandeur as he was a master of Caraveggesque chiaroscuro and naturalism. Furthermore, Ribera's prints and paintings alike had an enormous impact on the development of Baroque art all over Europe.
In his earlier style, founded sometimes on Caravaggio and sometimes on the wholly diverse method of Corregio,  the study of Spanish and Venetian masters may be traced. Along with his massive and predominating shadows, he retained from first to last a great strength in local coloring. His forms, although ordinary and sometimes coarse, are correct; the impression of his works gloomy and startling. He delighted in subjects of horror. In the early 1630s his style changed away from strong contrasts of dark and light to a more diffused and golden lighting.



Images and info from Wikipedia and Art Bible

1 comment:

Carla Ives said...

I did not know of this artist. His work is definitely a little dark, but I find that I am drawn to it nonetheless. I love the one of the man sleeping on the roadside.