Monday, July 26, 2010

Thomas Eakins at LACMA

Thomas Eakins, Wrestlers, 1899. Oil on canvas, 62 x 72 x 2 in. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Gift of Cecile C. Bartman and The Cecile and Fred Bartman Foundation. Photo: © 2007 Museum Associates/LACMA.
Although Eakins is now considered one of the great masters of nineteenth-century American art, his work, surprisingly, has not been extensively exhibited on the West Coast. During his lifetime, the artist showed close to home, primarily in Philadelphia and nearby New York City. Not until the end of his life, in 1915, did he display on the West Coast, at the Panama- Pacific Exposition in San Francisco.

After his death, Eakins’s widow, in a concerted effort to sell some of the extensive oeuvre that remained in her possession, organized traveling exhibitions of his paintings. The 1927 West Coast tour of twenty-five paintings was the first and last showing of Eakins's paintings in Los Angeles—until now.

Although I have problems with the way the show is displayed, it's well worth the trip. Eakins's work doesn't need a "steampunk" version of the rigging and ropes which were placed around the show's advertising banners; the visual clutter detracted from exhibit. I had just viewed the Fisher Collection at SFMOMA which is organized and hung so beautifully that it sensitized me to how a show looks when it's hung badly. I wouldn't say that the Eakins show was hung badly; it just wasn't hung well enough for a museum of LACMA's stature.

The introductory banner of John L. Sullivan was nice but it really didn't mirror Eakins's vision which was far darker and internal. I also appreciate that they avoided any of the controversies around his sexuality and let the works speak for themselves.  A wall text -- there is no catalog -- attests that modern sports signaled a new economic possibility for leisure time and a novel means of class mobility. (The wrestlers have sunburned faces and hands, meaning they're probably working-class young men.) Those social effects are still in force today. (Christopher Knight, LA TImes).

 I doubt if I will be traveling to Philadelphia any time soon where Eakins's masterpiece, "The Gross Clinic" has been restored and will be on display until 2011. The last time I was in the East Coast, all of the Eakins's paintings that I saw were in need of serious cleaning. The 19th century varnish had darkened so much that you couldn't see a lot of the painting through the murk and none of his drawings or the photographs that he used were on exhibit.

So this show is a much needed look at at one of American's genuine Old Masters. One of the things that I liked about Eakins is that his work is not controversial for the sake of being controversial; there's no sense of "look at what I did, see  how modern and transgressive and just oh-so-chic" I am. He certainly had the ego and used it, sometimes to his own detriment, but the grand standing that so often passes for talent in modern art is just not on display.

Organized exclusively for LACMA by Ilene Susan Fort, the museum’s Gail and John Liebes Curator of American Art, the exhibition celebrates the museum’s acquisition of Eakins’s last great sporting painting, "Wrestlers "(1899)—one of the single most important American paintings acquired in the history of LACMA.

Featuring around 60 oil paintings, drawings, watercolors, photographs, and sculpture by the great American master, the exhibition serves as a rare opportunity to examine for the first time the entire range of sporting images by this iconic American artist.

“Eakins considered the body amazingly beautiful and a remarkable mechanism of movement,” said Fort. “In his images from the late nineteenth-century of the athletic figure in action, Eakins created a new modern American hero; the sportsman—who can still be admired today by athletes and sports enthusiasts, as well as connoisseurs of great art.”

Manly Pursuits is organized chronologically, from the 1870s to 1899, and thematically by type of physical endeavor.



1870s: Rowing, Sailing, Hunting and Coaching : Although sun and fresh air pervade these river scenes, Eakins recorded the races with the precision and mathematical interest of a scientist. On view with their related paintings will be the large-scale perspective drawings in which he calculated the position of boats, oars, waves and even reflections.

His most colorful and impressionistic scene, "Fairman Rogers’ Four-in-Hand" was the sole example Eakins devoted to the upper middle-class activity of coaching (the art of driving horse-drawn carriages). It also was perhaps his most controversial sporting canvas since in it he attempted to depict the movement of the horses and wheels with photographic accuracy—an impulse many critics found to be at odds with the art of painting.

1880s: Swimming and Photography:  Eakins devoted his sole sporting canvas of the 1880s to this subject. Swimming (1884-85) was also one of the major paintings in which he demonstrated his new interest in photography. On view will be photographs that helped Eakins compose the scene along with his scientific studies of human anatomy and posture and his experimental motion photographs.

1890s: Boxing and Wrestling:
Eakins’s last sporting images feature boxers and wrestlers and showcase the new indoor spectator sports that attracted the attention of middle and working-class enthusiasts. These paintings, some of which rank among the artist’s largest canvases, are ironically among his least known endeavors in the sporting genre.

Review by Christopher Knight (LA TImes) - interesting comparison of Eakins with Courbet: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2010/07/thomas-eakins-sports-paintings-at-lacma.html

LACMA
How LACMA got the painting: http://lacmaonfire.blogspot.com/2010/07/how-lacma-got-wrestlers.html

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