Tuesday, July 3, 2018

John Singleton Copley. Born July 3, 1738

John Singleton Copley. Self Portrait

Paul Revere

Sam Adams

Mary and Elizabeth Royall

John Greenleaf
John Singleton Copley, (born July 3, 1738, Boston, Massachusetts [U.S.]—died September 9, 1815, London, England), American painter of portraits and historical subjects, generally acclaimed as the finest artist of colonial America.
Little is known of Copley’s boyhood. He gained familiarity with graphic art from his stepfather, the limner and engraver Peter Pelham, and developed an early sense of vocation: before he was 20 he was already an accomplished draughtsman. Copley soon discovered that his skills were most pronounced in the genre of portraiture. In his portraits, he revealed an intimate knowledge of his New England subjects and milieu and conveyed a powerful sense of physical entity and directness. Influenced by a Rococo portrait style derived from Joseph Blackburn, Copley made eloquent use of the portrait d’apparat—a Rococo device of portraying the subject with the objects associated with him in his daily life—that gave his work a liveliness and acuity not usually associated with 18th-century American painting. This device allowed Copley to insert English references into his portraits, thereby reinforcing the Anglophilia desired by many of his patrons. Encyclopedia Brittannica
Portrait of the Copley Family
He was urged by fellow artists who were familiar with his work to study in Europe, he did not venture out of Boston except for a seven-month stay in New York City (June 1771–January 1772). When political and economic conditions in Boston began to deteriorate (Copley’s father-in-law was the merchant to whom the tea that provoked the Boston Tea Party was consigned), Copley left the country in June 1774, never to return. In 1775 his wife, children, and several other family members arrived in London, and Copley established a home there in 1776.  He continued to paint with considerable success until the end of his life. 
Helibrun time Line of Art History: 
A new book, "A Revolution In Color: The World Of John Singleton Copley," tells his story and Here & Now's Alex Ashlock spoke with the author, Harvard University historian Jane Kamensky.
"A cautious man in a rash age, John Singleton Copley feared the onrush of the colonial rebellion against Great Britain. Like many people of his place and time, he called the rebels’ revolution a civil war. And like many people who had lived through civil wars before him, and who have endured them since, he thought the safest side was no side at all...."



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